HOW FAR WE'VE FALLENTHE DECLINE OF NORTH CAROLINA'S PUBLIC SCHOOLS

$6,186

Per-Student Investment in 2008

$5,658

Per-Student Investment in 2016

While the stock market has more than recovered from the Great Recession, education funding in North Carolina has continued to lag. In fact, adjusted for inflation, only six states have seen a larger drop in per-student investment than North Carolina.

WE ARE INVESTING $528 LESS PER STUDENT THIS YEAR THAN WE DID IN 2008, ADJUSTED FOR INFLATION

"We need to stop this bleeding NOW."
- Chris Baldwin, Macon County Superintendent

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$84.35

Textbook Funding Per Student in 2008

$46.42

Textbook Funding Per Student in 2016

In classrooms across North Carolina, students are facing a serious textbooks shortage. In many schools, there aren't enough books for students to take home for homework. This is a direct result of the cuts from General Assembly.

SINCE 2008, INVESTMENT IN TEXTBOOKS HAS FALLEN A STAGGERING 45%, ADJUSTED FOR INFLATION

Listen to what local parents and students have to say about the textbook shortage.

North Carolina's Textbook Shortage

How is a student supposed to complete their math homework without a textbook to bring home? It's simply not fair to our students when classrooms don't have the supplies they need.

While politicians in Raleigh have given billions to big corporations and the wealthy, textbook funding continues to be far less than 2008. We need better priorities and more investment in the classroom.


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"They don't have enough textbooks for the students to bring home."
- Anna Stearns, Parent of a High School student

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"A bathroom that doesn’t have toilet paper. A classroom lacking textbooks. A copy machine without paper. In some Rockingham County schools, there’s not enough money to buy these — and other things."
25th

NC Teacher Pay Ranking, 2008

41nd

NC Teacher Pay Ranking, 2016

Teachers continue to leave North Carolina at an alarming rate, and the reason is clear. We pay thousands of dollars less to teachers than our neighboring states. Even Texas routinely holds job fairs in NC to recruit our best and brightest teachers - and offering a $10,000 raise.

AVERAGE TEACHER PAY IN NORTH CAROLINA IS MORE THAN $10,000 LESS THAN THE NATIONAL AVERAGE


"If you are in North Carolina, it’s not worth it to become a teacher at this point. It’s really not."
- Callie Hammond, Lee County Teacher

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Catherine was one of the 13,557 North Carolina teachers who left their jobs in 2014.

Meet Catherine, a former NC teacher

Catherine is a former North Carolina teacher who left the state in 2014 to persue better options for her family. After years of teaching without a raise, Catherine made the difficult decision to move to Houston for a significant salary increase. She wasn't alone. In 2014 alone, nearly 40 teachers moved from NC to Houston, Texas.


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"We're staring down what I consider to be the greatest teacher shortage in our state's history."
- Dr. Greg Little, Mt. Airy City Schools Superintendent

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After 22 years of teaching in our state, Callie received a 0.3% raise in 2014

Meet Callie, a current NC teacher

Callie Hammond is a single mom, with two adopted daughters, who struggles to make ends meet as budget cuts have forced her to buy classroom supplies out of her own pocket. She put it bluntly when she said, "It's not worth it to become a teacher at this point."


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22,441

State-Funded TA Positions, 2008

15,364

State-Funded TA Positions, 2016

There are 7,138 fewer state-funded teaching assistant positions in North Carolina than we had in 2008. And in recent years, politicians have proposed even more dramatic cuts, including one proposal in 2015 that would eliminate more than half of all state-funded TAs and would be the largest layoff in state history.


"WE CANNOT LOSE ANY MORE ASSISTANTS. Our school is down to the bare bones as it is, and they do so much for our students."
- Christi Davis, Cumberland County Teacher

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Compilation of events featuring teachers and TAs speaking out

New Budget, Same Tired Story

In what has become an unfortunate ritual in Raleigh, TAs are once again fighting for their jobs in the face of massive cuts to public education.

Here's just a sample of some of the teachers, TAs and parents who are out there fighting to ensure our students have the classroom help they need.


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"We have a state that is dismantling our public school system. This state is going in the wrong direction when it comes to public education."

- Paul Bailey, Republican School Board Member, Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools