HOW FAR WE'VE FALLENA DECADE OF DECREASED FUNDING FOR NORTH CAROLINA SCHOOLS

$65.98

Classroom materials funding per student, 2008-09

$30.55

Classroom materials funding per student, 2017-18

Per-student funding for classroom materials is less than half of what it was before the recession, forcing teachers to buy school supplies with their own money to make up the difference.

SINCE 2008-09, PER-STUDENT FUNDING FOR CLASSROOM MATERIALS HAS FALLEN BY 54%, ADJUSTED FOR INFLATION.

" In no other profession in the world are workers tasked with moving mountains while being stripped of the resources to do so and then blamed when that mountain doesn't budge enough."
- Dave Wils, North Carolina Teacher

Take Action - or - Learn More
"Sure, the GOP budget gives teachers an average pay raise of 3.3 percent, but it’s a paltry sum if the intent is to make up for years of underpaying those entrusted with the future of North Carolina’s children, and thus the future itself."
25th

NC Teacher Pay Ranking, 2008-09

35th

NC Teacher Pay Ranking, 2017-18

Teachers continue to leave North Carolina at an alarming rate, and the reason is clear. We pay thousands of dollars less to teachers than our neighboring states. Even Texas routinely holds job fairs in NC to recruit our best and brightest teachers - and offering a $9,000 raise.

AVERAGE TEACHER PAY IN NORTH CAROLINA IS MORE THAN $9,000 LESS THAN THE NATIONAL AVERAGE


"I do not want to work a second job the rest of my career, that's not why I went to university."
- Elyse, Pitt County Teacher

Take Action - or - Learn More

After a busy day teaching school, Elyse Canon heads to the mall to work evenings and weekends.

Meet Elyse, a Pitt County high school teacher

Elyse is a high school psychology teacher in Pitt County in Eastern North Carolina. North Carolina's teaching salaries have not kept pace with inflation, so to help make ends meet, Elyse also moonlights evenings and weekends at a clothing retail store in her local shopping mall. North Carolina's classroom supply budget adjusted for inflation and enrollment growth is also down 54% since 2008. Elyse, like many NC teachers, are spending their own money to try to meet the needs of their students.


Share Elyse's story

Take Action - or - Learn More

High school teacher Denise Smith leaves the Macy's department store in Durham after another 16-hour day teaching and working in retail.

Meet Denise, a Chatham County high school teacher

When we caught up with Denise before Christmas in 2015, she was commuting 50 minutes after school to work retail at Macy's department store at night. She had a simple message for then-Governor Pat McCrory - teachers don't fee appreciated. Today, North Carolina has a new governor, but the legislature's budget (when adjusted for inflation) would still pay teachers less than they were paid in 2008-09. Denise is still teaching, but she's also still working at Macy's.


Share Denise's story

22,502

State-Funded TA Positions, 2008-09

15,720

State-Funded TA Positions, 2017-18

There are 6,782 fewer state-funded teaching assistant positions in North Carolina than we had in 2008-09. And in recent years, politicians have proposed even more dramatic cuts, including one proposal in 2015 that would eliminate more than half of all state-funded TAs and would be the largest layoff in state history.


$6,793

Per-Student Investment in 2008-09

$6,317

Per-Student Investment in 2017-18

While the stock market has more than recovered from the Great Recession, education funding in North Carolina has continued to lag. In fact, adjusted for inflation and growth in student enrollment, only six states have seen a larger drop in per-student investment than North Carolina.


WE ARE INVESTING $476 LESS PER STUDENT THIS YEAR THAN WE DID IN 2008-09, ADJUSTED FOR INFLATION AND ENROLLMENT GROWTH

Take Action - or - Learn More
"We have a state that is dismantling our public school system. This state is going in the wrong direction when it comes to public education."

- Paul Bailey, Republican School Board Member, Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools